How to Improve Your Childs Healthy Eating Habits

Developing healthy eating habits in your child is very important, and the earlier you can get your kids eating healthy, the better off they’ll be in the long run. The eating habits your child develops as they start preschool will likely stick with them their whole lives.

Provide Variety
A lot of kids want to eat the same foods over and over, and many children are fairly picky when it comes to what they will and will not eat. However, it’s your responsibility as a parent to get them in the habit of eating various healthy fruits and vegetables on a regular basis. Work these foods into your child’s diet creatively if you have to. A frozen banana makes an excellent substitute for ice cream, for example. Replace chicken, a favorite among preschool age children, with healthy fish like tuna or salmon.

Teach Your Kids How To Eat
How your child eats is as important as what they eat. Teach your child to eat slowly and concentrate on their food instead of sitting in front of the television or doing their homework. Portion control is also essential. When your child is old enough to put their food onto the plate themselves, teach them about the proper amount of each food to eat in one sitting.

Emphasize Water
Some natural 100% fruit juice or milk is healthy for children, but for the most part give your child water when they are thirsty and with their meals. A glass of milk in the morning can be a beneficial way to start the day, and juice provides vital nutrients, but getting your kids drinking water early will help make sure they don’t get in the habit of drinking high-calorie juice or soda all the time later in life.

Dorothy Hastings is the Director of First School, which are three preschool and child care centers located throughout Southern California. First School provides a hands-on approach to preschool education and Child Care programs that emphasizes all around child development. In addition to their intuitive academic approach, First School also focuses on developing a child’s social skills and self-confidence, which is made possible in their intimate learning atmosphere.
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